Tooth Extraction

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A dental extraction is not always required, but if all other options are exhausted, we can helpUsing the A standard dental extraction involves the removal of one or more teeth from the mouth. This can either be done simply or through surgical means, but the result will leave the patient without the tooth. A simple procedure usually doesn’t take much planning and can be done with a few instruments – such as a dental elevator and clamps.

 

This is not always the case, as some circumstances may require a surgical procedure to remove the tooth. This would be a more time-consuming process for cases where a tooth has broken under the gum line or patients are having trouble with an impacted wisdom tooth. This type of process may require more attention and planning than a simple extraction.

The procedure can be a little invasive, as your mouth will be going a level of trauma. Using advanced techniques, and deep numbing treatment will make your experience pain free and straightforward. It is common to feel pressure when having the tooth removed.

 

An initial x-ray will be required before treatment can continue. An x-ray will give your dentist the relevant background information on how your teeth are structured and if have any underlying infections. A special panoramic x-ray may be required for a wisdom tooth extraction, as there are more intricate details to take into consideration with the placement of wisdom teeth. The procedure itself may be different depending on the complexity of the case. For a simple extraction, a dental elevator will be used to initially loosen the tooth. Forceps will then be used to remove the tooth from the socket.

 

As previously stated, a more complex situation may call for surgical methods to be used, for example: making an incision into the gum, removing bone from around the tooth, or splitting the tooth in half in order to extract it.

What about aftercare?

Your dentist will give you the specifics on what to do after your treatment, but the general rule of thumb is to take it easy for the first 24 hours. As with any oral trauma, your body needs time to recover, so it is highly recommended to avoid touching or eating on the extraction site. Avoid any contact with the site – even with liquids – as it can be very easy to disturb the clot in the first 24 hours.

 

You are expected to experience some bleeding for the first 24 hours too, so it’s important not to panic and keep your head elevated for the rest of the day. After the first 24 hours period, you will be able to start using saltwater to gently rinse the site out. Furthermore, you should be able to start eating some soft, cold foods while the wound is still healing.